Temperature

mmenaz

Active Member
Jun 25, 2009
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Northern east Italy
I would be interested too! Some month ago I was plagued with a lot of "strange" VM behaviours, broken boots, clones unable to boot, whatever. After a lot of struggling I've found that the CPU fan was melted and so as soon as CPU temperature raised, all evil thing happened. If I only had a CPU temperature alert in the dashboard...
 
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oguz

Proxmox Retired Staff
Retired Staff
Nov 19, 2018
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apt install xsensors then run with sensors

you can write a little script to alert you via email if its over a certain degree. i leave this as an exercise to the reader ;)
 

oguz

Proxmox Retired Staff
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Nov 19, 2018
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mmenaz

Active Member
Jun 25, 2009
828
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Northern east Italy

oguz

Proxmox Retired Staff
Retired Staff
Nov 19, 2018
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ankorez

New Member
Sep 6, 2020
2
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apt install xsensors then run with sensors

you can write a little script to alert you via email if its over a certain degree. i leave this as an exercise to the reader ;)
Thanks for this tool :)
I've installed on my Proxmox Server it's exactly than i want
 

heldmar

New Member
Nov 3, 2021
10
1
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43
to add the feature we first need to rework pvestatd, so i'm guessing this might take a while.

for now your best solution would be using a monitoring software like zabbix

I am interested in doing something like this. Few questions:
  1. When you propose this, you mean to install it as a VM or IN the server itself?
  2. If the previous answer is in a VM, it still monitors the Proxmox (physical hardware)?
  3. If the answer to question 1 is in the server itself: will it also monitor your VMs and Containers?
Thanks in advance.
 

Dunuin

Famous Member
Jun 30, 2020
9,039
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Germany
For Zabbix you need a Zabbix server somewhere (I'm running a debian VM with 1 vCPU, 2.5 GiB RAM and 64 GiB storage for that) and the zabbix agent that needs to be installed directly on your PVE host. But keep in mind that Zabbix writes a lot. All the metrics need to be stored in a DB doing sync writes which causes alot of write amplification. Here on the homeserver Zabbix it is writing maybe 200 GB per day to the SSDs just for monitoring around 30 VMs/LXC/hosts. So thats a bit overkill if you just want to monitor the temperature of your PVE host and don't care about monitoring other metrics or hosts/guests too.
 
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heldmar

New Member
Nov 3, 2021
10
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For Zabbix you need a Zabbix server somewhere (I'm running a debian VM with 1 vCPU, 2.5 GiB RAM and 64 GiB storage for that) and the zabbix agent that needs to be installed directly on your PVE host. But keep in mind that Zabbix writes a lot. All the metrics need to be stored in a DB doing sync writes which causes alot of write amplification. Here on the homeserver Zabbix it is writing maybe 200 GB per day to the SSDs just for monitoring around 30 VMs/LXC/hosts. So thats a bit overkill if you just want to monitor the temperature of your PVE host and don't care about monitoring other metrics or hosts/guests too.
Thank you!

I want to run it to monitor my PVE server, a couple of Containers and a couple of VMs and 2 remote servers (hosted on AWS).

Do you think will require a lot of disk and IO on that scenario?
 

TaterSalad

New Member
Dec 12, 2020
5
0
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28
apt install xsensors then run with sensors

you can write a little script to alert you via email if its over a certain degree. i leave this as an exercise to the reader ;)
Are there any guides to setting up such an alert you are aware of?
 

locknessKo

New Member
Jan 22, 2022
1
4
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Are there any guides to setting up such an alert you are aware of?
You can create a cronjob that runs a bash script which checks if something is over a certain temperature and calls back to a slack webhook:

Bash:
#! /bin/bash

# ©locknessKo 2022

# Slack incoming webhook URL
slack_url=https://hooks.slack.com/services/xxx/xxx/xxx

# Threshold for when to send alert
threshold=80

sensors | grep -e "temp1" | while read line; do
        temp=$(echo $line | awk -F "+" '{ print $2 }' | awk -F "." '{ print $1 }');
        if (( temp > $threshold )); then
                curl -X POST -H 'Content-type: application/json' --data "{'text':'ALERT for $(hostname). Temperature is $temp degrees'}" $slack_url;
        fi;
        done

The above code produces an output like this:
1642847580675.png

A guide on how to setup slack incoming webhook: https://api.slack.com/messaging/webhooks

How to use cronjobs: https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-do-i-add-jobs-to-cron-under-linux-or-unix-oses/

Hope this helps!
 

dsjstc

New Member
Dec 24, 2021
4
4
3
51
Here's a page showing how to hack CPU temperature (from lm-sensors) into the text at the top of the node summary page. Work isn't my own, but I've confirmed it works on PVE 7.1. Would be nice to have a graph, or some kind of flashing alarm when it exceeds threshold, but at least this puts it somewhere that I *might* notice.

https://www.programmerall.com/article/5981210525/
 
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morairtym

New Member
Feb 13, 2022
1
0
1
35
So Epyc cpu's work but they are not called core 0,1,2,3....
Its Tctl,Tdie,Tccd1,3,5....
So I made an adjustment to the JS to replace Tctl with core 0 so I can use it on my cluster of amd and intel systems.

JavaScript:
    {
        itemId: 'thermal',
        colspan: 2,
            printBar: false,
            title: gettext('CPU temperature'),
            textField: 'thermalstate',
            renderer:function(value){
            var c0val = value.replace("Tctl","Core 0");
            var c0 = c0val.match(/Core 0.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
        return `CPU Temp: ${c0}`
       }     
    }
 

Chris87

New Member
Feb 20, 2022
1
0
1
35
Hey just a question does anyone know how to modify the script for a dual socket cpus, as follows for the hack and may be throuw in the gpu in loc1

{
itemId: 'thermal',
colspan: 2,
printBar: false,
title: gettext('CPU temperature'),
textField: 'thermalstate',
renderer:function(value){
const c0 = value.match(/Core 0.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c1 = value.match(/Core 1.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c2 = value.match(/Core 2.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c3 = value.match(/Core 3.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c4 = value.match(/Core 4.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c8 = value.match(/Core 8.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c9 = value.match(/Core 9.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c10 = value.match(/Core 10.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c11 = value.match(/Core 11.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
const c12 = value.match(/Core 12.*?\+([\d\.]+)?/)[1];
return `Core: ${c0} | ${c1} | ${c2} | ${c3} | ${c4} | ${c8} | ${c9} | ${c10} | ${c11} | ${c12}`
}
}

This has two package ids reading from sensors command
coretemp-isa-0001
Adapter: ISA adapter
Package id 1: +42.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 0: +37.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 1: +39.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 2: +42.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 3: +34.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 4: +34.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 8: +37.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 9: +38.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 10: +35.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 11: +36.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 12: +36.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)

nvme-pci-4400
Adapter: PCI adapter
Composite: +30.9°C (low = -273.1°C, high = +80.8°C)
(crit = +81.8°C)
Sensor 1: +30.9°C (low = -273.1°C, high = +65261.8°C)
Sensor 2: +33.9°C (low = -273.1°C, high = +65261.8°C)

coretemp-isa-0000
Adapter: ISA adapter
Package id 0: +42.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 0: +39.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 1: +42.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 2: +35.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 3: +35.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 4: +39.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 8: +38.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 9: +41.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 10: +42.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 11: +39.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)
Core 12: +41.0°C (high = +85.0°C, crit = +95.0°C)

i350bb-pci-0103
Adapter: PCI adapter
loc1: +66.0°C (high = +120.0°C, crit = +110.0°C)
 

Gavcol

New Member
Feb 12, 2022
18
0
1
47
Any luck yet in getting thermal sensors passthrough host ? rework on pvestatd ?
Email alerts aren't an option right now.
It would be great if this worked and had a working thermal sensor widget on the pfsense dashboard.
 

gyrex

Member
Jul 19, 2022
86
18
8
You can create a cronjob that runs a bash script which checks if something is over a certain temperature and calls back to a slack webhook:

Bash:
#! /bin/bash

# ©locknessKo 2022

# Slack incoming webhook URL
slack_url=https://hooks.slack.com/services/xxx/xxx/xxx

# Threshold for when to send alert
threshold=80

sensors | grep -e "temp1" | while read line; do
        temp=$(echo $line | awk -F "+" '{ print $2 }' | awk -F "." '{ print $1 }');
        if (( temp > $threshold )); then
                curl -X POST -H 'Content-type: application/json' --data "{'text':'ALERT for $(hostname). Temperature is $temp degrees'}" $slack_url;
        fi;
        done

The above code produces an output like this:
View attachment 33545

A guide on how to setup slack incoming webhook: https://api.slack.com/messaging/webhooks

How to use cronjobs: https://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-do-i-add-jobs-to-cron-under-linux-or-unix-oses/

Hope this helps!

Thanks for this awesome script. I've got it working but I've never used slack before. Is there some way to redirect the alerts via some sort of notification to an email address when the messages are posted in slack?

Edit: figured it out, thanks again for this script
 
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