Disk shows as full

Totte

New Member
Oct 20, 2021
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tottelundgren.com
Hi, my VM-disk shows as full and I cannot figure out why. This gives lots of weird R/W errors. I barely got anything on the VM. Running a MC Server and a Jellyfin I'm not using. Any help in the right direction, much appreciated. =)

Code:
totte@ubuntu:~$ sudo fdisk -l
Disk /dev/loop0: 55.51 MiB, 58191872 bytes, 113656 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop1: 55.5 MiB, 58183680 bytes, 113640 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop2: 61.85 MiB, 64835584 bytes, 126632 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop3: 61.85 MiB, 64835584 bytes, 126632 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop4: 32.45 MiB, 34017280 bytes, 66440 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop5: 67.24 MiB, 70504448 bytes, 137704 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop6: 42.18 MiB, 44220416 bytes, 86368 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/loop7: 67.25 MiB, 70508544 bytes, 137712 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes




GPT PMBR size mismatch (67108863 != 134217727) will be corrected by write.
The backup GPT table is not on the end of the device. This problem will be corrected by write.
Disk /dev/sda: 64 GiB, 68719476736 bytes, 134217728 sectors
Disk model: QEMU HARDDISK
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: E7A6B1D5-4C23-4762-9711-A5B6B970F6F0

Device       Start      End  Sectors Size Type
/dev/sda1     2048     4095     2048   1M BIOS boot
/dev/sda2     4096  2101247  2097152   1G Linux filesystem
/dev/sda3  2101248 67106815 65005568  31G Linux filesystem


Disk /dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv: 20 GiB, 21474836480 bytes, 41943040 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes


Disk /dev/sdb: 1.37 TiB, 1500301910016 bytes, 2930277168 sectors
Disk model: QEMU HARDDISK
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x88fb1243

Device     Boot Start        End    Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/sdb1          63 2930275119 2930275057  1.4T 42 SFS


Disk /dev/sdc: 465.78 GiB, 500106780160 bytes, 976771055 sectors
Disk model: QEMU HARDDISK
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: gpt
Disk identifier: 3C71C6B3-A556-49D7-902A-086D8A4832A1

Device     Start       End   Sectors   Size Type
/dev/sdc1   2048 976769023 976766976 465.8G Linux filesystem


Code:
Filesystem                        1K-blocks     Used Available Use% Mounted on
udev                                2926292        0   2926292   0% /dev
tmpfs                                594292     1036    593256   1% /run
/dev/mapper/ubuntu--vg-ubuntu--lv  20511312 19926528         0 100% /
tmpfs                               2971460        0   2971460   0% /dev/shm
tmpfs                                  5120        0      5120   0% /run/lock
tmpfs                               2971460        0   2971460   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
/dev/loop2                            63360    63360         0 100% /snap/core20/1242
/dev/loop3                            63360    63360         0 100% /snap/core20/1169
/dev/loop0                            56832    56832         0 100% /snap/core18/2246
/dev/loop1                            56832    56832         0 100% /snap/core18/2253
/dev/sda2                            999320   207412    723096  23% /boot
/dev/loop4                            33280    33280         0 100% /snap/snapd/13640
/dev/loop5                            68864    68864         0 100% /snap/lxd/21803
/dev/loop6                            43264    43264         0 100% /snap/snapd/14066
/dev/loop7                            68864    68864         0 100% /snap/lxd/21835
tmpfs                                594292        0    594292   0% /run/user/1000
 

Dunuin

Famous Member
Jun 30, 2020
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Your root LV is only 20GB. A minecraft server can easily fill that up. And looks like your 1.4TB and 0,5TB virtual disks aren't used at all (or atleast they are not mounted). If they should be mounted but aren't everything that should be written to those disks will be written to the unmounted mountpoint and therefore will be written to your root partition instead. That is the most common problem when the root partition suddenly fills up.

So I would verify that these disks aren't mounted and then check the mountpoints. If the mountpoints aren't empty hat is your problem and you should backup the content of that two mountpoints, delete all stuff in them and then check why mounting the two disks failed and make sure the mountnig will work in the future.
 
Last edited:

Totte

New Member
Oct 20, 2021
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tottelundgren.com
Your root LV is only 20GB. A minecraft server can easily fill that up. And looks like your 1.4TB and 0,5TB virtual disks aren't used at all (or atleast they are not mounted). If they should be mounted but aren't everything that should be written to those disks will be written to the unmounted mountpoint and therefore will be written to your root partition instead. That is the most common problem when the root partition suddenly fills up.

So I would verify that these disks aren't mounted and then check the mountpoints. If the mountpoints aren't empty hat is your problem and you should backup the content of that two mountpoints, delete all stuff in them and then check why mounting the two disks failed and make sure the mountnig will work in the future.

The 1.4 & 0.5 can be ignored. They're just "raw physical disks" of data/media I had in my old server. Haven't setup proper raids yet, because I need to buy new disks. So those I just mount if I need to grab some raw footage or something. :p Any way to expand my 20GB (The disk is a 128GB SSD)? Totally new to hypervisors =D

I got an unused 4TB disk I created a Directory out of. Can I clone my machines over to that one or is there any other way? Is this a "decent" solution or bad practice?
 
Last edited:

Dunuin

Famous Member
Jun 30, 2020
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Only moving a VM to a bigger storage won't help. You also need to resize your virtual disk so the guest sees a bigger disk. But then your ubuntu is still partitioned to only use 20GB. So inside your guest you would need to resize your VG first and then resize your LV on that VG. And then you need to grow your actual filesystem on that LV. Only after all that is done your ununtu guest can make use of more space.
 

Totte

New Member
Oct 20, 2021
10
0
1
33
Sweden
tottelundgren.com
An
Only moving a VM to a bigger storage won't help. You also need to resize your virtual disk so the guest sees a bigger disk. But then your ubuntu is still partitioned to only use 20GB. So inside your guest you would need to resize your VG first and then resize your LV on that VG. And then you need to grow your actual filesystem on that LV. Only after all that is done your ununtu guest can make use of more space.
Any pointers or documentation on how to do this? =D Or would it just be simpler to reinstall the Ubuntu on a new VM?
 

Dunuin

Famous Member
Jun 30, 2020
5,656
1,287
144
Germany
Moving the virtual disk and resizing it works over the PVE WebUI. For all the other stuff inside the guest you should look for some ubuntu LVM tutorials.
 
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